Finding ‘Studies in Intelligence’

On Twitter, I noticed John Sipher, who served in CIA’s National Clandestine Service and was a member of the Senior Intelligence Service, share a link to a New Yorker story about the Agency’s journal ‘Studies in Intelligence’.

For intelligence scholars, ‘Studies’ is a wonderful resource, as there isn’t an abundance of literature that concerns the intelligence business, so having a publication showing the evolution of thinking of various aspects of the trade – by practitioners themselves – is quite valuable.

The article had me going back to CIA’s website to track down where exactly all the ‘Studies’ articles are, and they actually are scattered across several places.

The unclassified parts from 1992 to present day are here: CSI Publications – Studies in Intelligence

However, declassified articles seem to be in three different places.

The Studies Archive Index contains a mix of unclassified and declassified articles, according to the site around 600. (Didn’t count to check.) These span a time period from the first issue in the 1950s to 2004, but it’s not complete. (I’ll get back this in a minute.)

The Declassified Articles collection in the FOIA reading room contains declassified articles from 1970s until the present day. Thus, if you’re looking for more recent declassified articles, this is what you should check out.

Now, during my dives into the archive, I’ve also found some entire issues of ‘Studies’ through the CREST collection. So I went back to browse some of those hits, and found an issue from 1984. (The issue starts from PDF page 16; cover says 1984, but TOC says 1985.) These articles were not in the archive index. So, it seems the archive index is not a complete representation of what’s been declassified since the 1970s.

I have not mapped out what’s missing from the archive index vs. what’s in the CREST archive, but I’ll take a look at this at a later date. Seems it might be worthwhile to track down, index and make available the articles from ‘Studies’ that are currently sitting in the archive without any metadata.

Update, January 6th, 2018: On Twitter, Ivan Dimitrijević pointed out that the Logiques du renseignement website has an index of 1650 articles, with links to about 900 of them. According to the site, their list was last updated on May 2015, which would mean it doesn’t take into account the January 2017 release of documents online. They also go on to note:

[The list] represents more than 80% of the complete corpus of the first twenty years (1955-1974), around 60% for the following twenty (1975-1994), and probably less than 50% for the last twenty (1995-2014).

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